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public:nnels:etext:poetry [2020/05/08 14:17]
rachel.osolen [Q&A]
public:nnels:etext:poetry [2020/06/30 09:42]
rachel.osolen [Q&A]
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    </​poem>​    </​poem>​
  
-=====Q&​A=====+=====Q&​A ​Archive===== 
 + 
 +Q: Hi: another poetry question : ) This is regarding How to Dress a Fish. There is again a lot of complex formatting in the original text. However, I've come across something new in the second poem, "Fox Hunting"​. The sections of the poem with more complex formatting have been inserted as images instead of text. I'm wondering how you think I should handle this: should I transcribe the poems into text and delete the images (and lose most of the formatting),​ or should I keep the images and transcribe the text as a prod note? 
 + 
 +Looking ahead, there is a mixture of text and images. A particularly complex one is the image for [grocery list, July 26, 2015]. I lean towards keeping the images and doing prod notes for them because of how complex and visual they are but I wanted to check what you thought. 
 + 
 +A: I looked at the book, and this is a tricky one. Text as images is a big publisher no-no. We currently do not retain complex formatting for DAISY books. 
 + 
 +For most of this collection you want to adhere to this and transcribe and remove all images of text //except// [Side 1] and [Side 2] in "Fox Hunting":​ 
 + 
 +  * First transcribe and markup the poem styles as per wiki standards 
 +  * insert a In-Text Producer'​s Note explaining what has been lost at the beginning of the poem, 
 +  * Keep the images and do an In-text Producer'​s note after the image describing the formatting. 
 +  * Enter simple Alt-text for image (e.g. Section of poem as originally formatted.) 
 + 
 +Other formatting tasks for this book: 
 + 
 +  * retain italics, underline and strikethrough when they occur. 
 +  * For the lines and small decorative images that work as content breaks, replace them all with the asterisks. 
 +  * For the text boxes, use the wiki standards. 
 +  * Keep the black boxes and add the alt-text "thick black line that blocks out word"​ 
 + 
 +For an example of another tricky book I recommend downloading '​Whereas'​ from our repository. If you have more questions about this one ask away! 
 + 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Q: I am editing a book of poetry, Arias by Sharon Olds. One of the poems uses scansion marks to indicate syllable stress in the middle of the poem. How should I approach this to ensure it is read appropriately?​ 
 + 
 +Here is the relevant part of the poem: 
 + 
 +being the baby, 
 +being the mother, 
 +/ - - / - , , / - - / - , 
 +dactyl, trochee, dactyl, trochee, 
 +active witness, active witness of the witness. 
 + 
 +A: Leave it as is. You can mention in the Producers note at the beginning that the poem include scansion marks to indicate syllable stress. 
 + 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 + 
 +Q: Follow up to the Magnetic Equator poetry question. I did read the section on complex poetry formatting before posting my question. The example says to use an inline prod note before each poem to describe the formatting. However, if you look at the poems in this book, their formatting is more variable and complex than the example so many of them would require a very long and hard to follow prod note because there'​s not a regular pattern to the odd spacing. After reading the wiki instructions,​ I wasn't sure that the instructions would work for these poems due to their complexity. I agree that inserting [space] interrupts the flow which is why I wasn't sure if this was any better and posted my question. So, just checking, is a prod note like this what you think I should do for each poem?: 
 + 
 +BEGIN PRODUCER'​S NOTE 
 +In the following poem, there is a blank page between each stanza.  
 +In the first stanza, the first line is center justified. The second line is indented and there is a space in between the word "​seawall"​ and "​thought"​. The fourth, fifth and seventh lines are right justified. On the eighth line, there is a large space between the words "​me?"​ and "​is"​. The ninth line is indented. The tenth line is right justified and has a large space between the words "​waves"​ and "​overlapping"​. The eleventh line has a large space between the words "​coasting"​ and "​territories"​. The twelfth line is indented. The thirteenth line is right justified. The fifteenth line is right justified and has a large space between the words "​retour..."​ and "​out"​. The sixteenth line is right justified and has a space between the words "​revelation"​ and "​sucked"​. The seventeenth line has a space between the words "​gurgles"​ and "​I"​. The eighteenth line has a space between the words "​continent"​ and "​a"​. The twentieth line has two spaces. One between "​sand"​ and "​ripped"​ and one between "​envelopes"​ and "​fine"​. The twenty-first line has a space between "​unfolds"​ and "​the"​. The twenty-second line has a space between "​ways"​ and "​sand"​. (Etc, etc).  
 +END PRODUCER'​S NOTE 
 + 
 +or would you recommend a simpler but less informative note like this: 
 + 
 +BEGIN PRODUCER'​S NOTE 
 +The following stanza has some lines that are right justified. It also has large spaces placed irregularly in the middle of lines. 
 +END PRODUCER'​S NOTE 
 + 
 +A: The simple version of the inline producer'​s note is best. We don't have to go into specific details on where the spacing is, just that we did not retain it. Example; "The following poem included spaces within the lines of the poem, as well as left and right justification of different lines and stanzas."​ or something similar. 
 + 
 +Remember that an inline producer'​s note can **only** go before the title styled with ''​Poem - Title (DAISY)''​ and after the poem title in ''​Heading''​ style. This means each poem that has complex styling gets one note. 
 + 
 +Most people will be reading the poetry for leisure so the producer’s notes are just to let people know formatting has been removed and maybe provide some general description on how it was originally formatted. If a reader requests a copy with original formatting or wants to know details about the original formatting then we can always do that a later date (that’s yet to happen.) Remember, a key rule of thumb to accessibility is keeping it simple. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 + 
 +Q: I am doing a book of poetry, Magnetic Equator, and the poems are formatted with unusual spaces and justification. I've attached samples screenshots of one of the poems, with a screenshot of how I'm trying to represent the original formatting. I also thought I'd put a prod note at the beginning explaining that spaces and right justification are marked throughout the poems to represent the original formatting. Please let me know if this works or if there'​s a better way to do this.  
 + 
 +{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​exploding_radio_original.png?​600|}} 
 +{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​exploding_radio_formatted.png?​600|}}  
 + 
 +A: Though I see what you are attempting to do here, but it disrupts the reading of the text. We have a section on the wiki that explains how to produce complex poetry. Here is a [[public:​nnels:​etext:​poetry#​complex_formatting_and_producer_s_notes|direct link]]. 
 + 
 +---- 
  
 Q: Another poetry question: In the book Treaty #, on page 1, 33, and 63, there are a bunch of backwards words. They'​re English but they'​re spelled backwards. They also seem to be slightly out of order. I'm just wondering if you have any suggestions about how to handle this? Do you think I should just leave it as is?  The backwards English words are so hard to read (which I think is the author'​s point) but people with print disabilities may not be able to access them at all this way. I'm wondering about inserting a second version with the words spelled normally but still out of order, with a producer'​s note explaining that in the original version, they are spelled backwards? Just for accessibility reasons. Q: Another poetry question: In the book Treaty #, on page 1, 33, and 63, there are a bunch of backwards words. They'​re English but they'​re spelled backwards. They also seem to be slightly out of order. I'm just wondering if you have any suggestions about how to handle this? Do you think I should just leave it as is?  The backwards English words are so hard to read (which I think is the author'​s point) but people with print disabilities may not be able to access them at all this way. I'm wondering about inserting a second version with the words spelled normally but still out of order, with a producer'​s note explaining that in the original version, they are spelled backwards? Just for accessibility reasons.
public/nnels/etext/poetry.txt · Last modified: 2020/07/31 14:03 by rachel.osolen