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public:nnels:etext:q_a [2020/03/25 11:50]
rachel.osolen
public:nnels:etext:q_a [2020/05/12 15:55] (current)
jillian.metchooyeah
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 Post here your questions (at the top of the page) and we shall invent answers! :) Post here your questions (at the top of the page) and we shall invent answers! :)
  
-In case you're wondering where your questions went: they got moved to the pages where the information should be... they'​re all listed as Q&As on the (hopefully) relevant pages and we'll work on incorporating ​the bits into the documentation directly. ​+<note important>​First check the wiki for an answerThere are past Q&A's archived at the bottom of most sections that may have your answer. If you still can't find the answer post here!</​note> ​
  
 Thank you for all your outstanding questions so far, and please keep posting them here. Thank you for all your outstanding questions so far, and please keep posting them here.
  
 +<​note>​In case you're wondering where your questions went: they got moved to the pages where the information should be... they'​re all listed as Q&As on the (hopefully) relevant pages and we'll work on incorporating the bits into the documentation directly.</​note>​
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-Q: Hello! I have a question about an image in the book I'm working on, "​Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus"​. In the Prologue, every time the author writes "​Muhammad",​ he inserts a small image. The footnote explains that the image is a symbol representing an Arabic phrase: "​peace ​and blessings of Allah be upon him". I'm thinking of handling this by deleting the image of the symbol and replacing it with the phrase in brackets. What do you think? If I do thatshould ​insert a prod note explaining what did?+Q:  
 +**Edit:​** ​I've tried with Adobe Digital Editions ​and Calibre. I just tried with Thoriumbut get an Import Failed message when try to open the book...
  
-AIn this case you would treat it as a regular image and insert the Alt-Text: symbol representing an Arabic phrase: "peace and blessings of Allah be upon him". You would then put a Producers Note at the beginning of the book to explain why you did this. For more info see [[public:​nnels:​etext:​language#​working_with_images_of_words_and_different_alphabets|here.]]+The Notes that are not linked for me are:
  
-----+Chapter 7, note 3, 18, 19
  
-Q: Another question about "What the Bible is All About"​. This is about the glossary. It gives a pronunciation guide for many of the terms (eg. "​eunuch (YOO-nuhk)"​ ) which includes uppercase letters to show which syllable receives the emphasis. Is it okay to leave all the uppercase letters alone and add a Prod Note explaining that screen readers may not pronounce the pronunciation guide portions correctly?+Chapter 10, note 6
  
-AYeswe can just leave as is written, since that’s the way to indicate pronunciation. An optional producer’s note at the beginning of the section ​is a good idea! =)+QHow should I handle endnotes that are not properly linked in the original text (QuarantineWhat is Old is New by Ian Arthur Cameron)
  
-----+From the original text, it looks like: 
 +{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​quarantine_screenshot.png?​600|}}
  
 +Notes 18 and 19 don't link to anything.
  
-Q: In the book "What the Bible is All About",​ there is a sort of mnemonic that I'm unsure how to format. It's in chapter 45 on page 508 when I view it in Adobe Digital Editions. It displays as follows: 
  
-Forsaking+A: What ereader are you using? It could be the reading software. When I opened up the ebook in iBooks, all the notes work. I also opened it in Thorium and it worked. If you don't have Thorium you can download it [[https://​www.edrlab.org/​software/​thorium-reader/​|here]].
  
-All 
  
-I 
  
-Take 
  
-Him+---- 
 +Q: I have a follow up question about the poetry book, How to Dress a Fish. In your answer below regarding the sections of text that are censored with a black box, you said, "Keep the black boxes and add the alt-text "thick black line that blocks out word" ". I'm just looking for some clarification around this. 
  
-So, it looks like a list but isn't really a list. And it has the first letter ​of each word bolded ​to show that they spell "​Faith"​For now, have left it with each word on a separate line but not as a list and applied Strong style to the first letter of each word to mimic how it appears ​in the book. Do you think there's a better way to handle it?+I expected that the black boxes would be images ​of black boxes since you said to add alt-text for them. I've actually found that all the black boxes I've encountered so far (I'm about 30% through) are regular text in the docx file - so, I can see the word that was originally blacked out in the text and there are no images of black boxes to add alt-text to. 
  
-A: The way you handled this is correct. You don't have to format ​this as a list, and keep the first letter in strong style ​Good ​work!+So, to format ​it to be like the originalI was deleting the word meant to be blacked out and then inserting ​the Unicode that you gave me for another poetry book, U+25ACBut I just realized that I can instead highlight the word that needs to be blacked out and use the highlight tool to make it black. Then it looks just like the original. Is it okay to proceed that way? There are also some words that are highlighted grey but still legible and I thought I could apply this technique to these as well. Does highlighting words work when you do the XML markup? If this approach won't work, should I stick with the Unicode symbol of a black bar?
  
 +A: Sorry for the confusion. ​ Highlighting is not accessible, most direct formatting is not which is why we rely so heavy on styles. Your original approach to deleting and inserting the black bar is the best way to go. Keep it as close to the original as possible. Great work! 
  
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-Q: Unsure if the tables were formatted correctly in Appendix A at the end of the book 101 ways to meeting angels by Karen Paolino.+Q: I have a formatting question from Zagreb One Four. Could you look at the attached page where there are transcripts ​of the conversations between the pilots and the air traffic control? I'm not sure about how to format these. They appear as columns but they are time-stamped two way conversations so I'm not sure if columns would be the most accessible way to present the text? I see on the wiki that columns are rarely used and usually better as a table or list. I tried formatting each line of dialogue as a list but I wasn't sure if that was right.
  
-From the Tables section of the wiki"A caption or description should always be included to give context to a table"+{{:public:​nnels:​etext:​zagreb_one_four_screenshot.jpg?​600|}}
  
-I am interpreting the '​or'​ in '​caption or description'​ to mean to include ​one of the two (either caption or description)But given our past conversation on inclusion of alt text, perhaps i should be including both? Caption and Description?​ But when followed ​the wiki's instructions to add description,​ it was greyed out and I was unable to edit it, so only captions are present for the tables.+A: Great question! In this case columns are definitely not a good choice, so good call on that one. I would approach this the same way you approach dialogue in play.
  
-AI will fix the wording in the wiki, but every table should have Alt-Text. +Example:
-When it comes to not being able to access the Alt-Text in the table priorities, it looks like this is an issue with they way the document was saved. ​ Just resave and replace the document using the 'Save As' option and double check to ensure it is saving as a .docx file. It will prompt you to replace the file, just accept and replace the file. It should now work!+
  
-I creates a short video to illustrate what I meanhttps://​screencast-o-matic.com/​watch/​cYn6q2wTtP+09.5522"​ ZagredAdria 548, level check?
  
-Word is a finicky beast!+JP548: Out of 190 (climbing from Flight Level 190).
  
 +09.5525"​ Zagreb: Thank you ...
  
-----+Time to call 550:
  
-QI'm just about finished this book but am having difficulty with one section: the Photo Credits at the end. They provide credit for some of the photos but I'm having a hard time telling which credit goes with which photos. They appear to be referring to roman numeral page numbers within the photo inserts but when I view the epub file in Calibre or in Adobe Digital EditionsI don't see the page numbers in the photo section so I have no idea which photos are on which page. So I can't tell which credit goes with which photo. I'm also not sure how to format this section. It seems a bit like an index where it's pointing the reader to specific pages so I was going to treat it like an index and format it as a list with a Prod Note about the page numbers being included but not valid. And then I was going to copy each photo credit and add it to the caption for the photo it belongs to (but then ran into the problem of not knowing which credit belongs to which photo).+0.55 50" ZagredAdria 550recleared 360, call passing 220.
  
-A: First off--wow this is terribly formatted. Now to your questions: 
- 
-I opened the book up in Calibre, and looked at the photo credit section. The text at the top of the section states that all photos are copyright Stevie Cameron expect where otherwise noted. Then the hyperlinked list goes directly to the images that are NOT credited to Stevie Cameron, and the clue to which image that is in in the hyperlink text.  For instance, the first on is the top image on the page ( ii (top) Toronto Star/​GetStock.) I am still not sure what the roman numerals are, but they are confusing. Following that logic you can identify each image as it hyperlinks to the respective pages. ​ Since we don't use page numbers the best way to deal with this section is just take each copyright statement and add it into the end of the captions for each image (or as a caption itself if the image has no caption.) Then erase the hyperlinked list, but retain the section with the opening sentences and add an inline producers note explaining what you changed (i.e. in the original book the additional copyright information was presented as a hyperlinked list. Due to the conversion process we have reformatted that information to be included in the captions of the images respectively...or something along those lines.) ​ Let me know if you have more questions. ​ I am also gonna copy this to the Q&A section of the wiki.  
- 
-As for locating page numbers in Calibre, there is a text bar in the top left corner of the E-Book viewer that shows the page numbers (e.g. 486.0/1435 is page 486 out of 1435) 
  
 ---- ----
 +Q: Hi, I have a new question about Magnetic Equator. I'm not sure what to make of the first stanza of the poem "​alterity"​. Whether I view the epub file in Calibre or Adobe Reader, the lines run over top of each other. But they do so differently in the two readers so I don't think it's intentional. And then when I compare the words to my docx file, the lines are in a different order. I noticed something similar on the first page of the poem "​mantra falls" but in that case the words running over top of each other only happened in Reader and not in Calibre and the lines weren'​t out of order so I just switched to viewing the text in Calibre. ​
  
-Q: I'm wondering if there is any way for me to check whether the images I've inserted into a book are the correct format (eg. JPG or PNG). They all look the same to me and I can'​t ​find any way to identify the file type within ​the Word doc. I follow ​the procedure ​for inserting images outlined in the wiki so it usually doesn'​t matter but in very long books, I sometimes miss a few but I can'​t ​double check if missed any because I can't tell what file format they are.+I've also noticed that for this file, I can'​t ​enlarge the print to see if that fixes the problemSo, my question is, how do decide what order the lines are supposed to be in for this stanza if I can'​t ​view a readable original version? Can just trust that the docx file has it right?
  
-AUnfortunatelythere is no easy way to find the image types within the word document. You can save your edited word document as webpage, which will create a folder with all the extracted images. This file will show you all the image format types within your document, but it wont necessarily show you where they areYou would have to go through the images ​in the folder and try to match the images to the documentwhich can be time consuming.+Edited to addI was having very similar issues with the next book of poetry I took"​Heft",​ so I tried one more thing: I tried opening ​the epub on different computer than the one I usually use because ​it has a much bigger monitorLines were still overlapping ​in Adobe Reader but in Calibrecan finally see the pages without any overlapping. So I think I'm good now.
  
-Another tip is to look at your workflow and try to see where you are making ​an error in your workflow ​to try and avoid it from happening again+A: I am glad you sorted it out. There is nothing wrong with the file, it is just an issue with the reader. If it happens again you might want to try a different reader such as [[https://​www.edrlab.org/​software/​thorium-reader/​|Thorium]] that is free to all operating systems. I used it on my Windows PC laptop and the issue of overlapping lines did not occur.
  
-There are two issues that can be causing this to occur, and they both have slightly different solutions: one has to do with workflow of extracting images, and one has to do with the workflow of replacing images. 
  
-Extracting Images: The only method of extracting images that could cause an incorrect file format to occur is with screenshots. This is easily fixed by just double checking with each screenshot you take that you are saving the file in the correct format (gif, jpeg, png, or svg.) Again, this is only if you are using screenshots,​ if you are not using screenshots then you should address your workflow.+----
  
-Replacing ImagesYou mentioned this only happens with larger books, which is understandable since there are more images and more room for errors. I do not know what your workflow is for replacing images in the text, but it is a good idea to evaluate your current workflow and see if there is any way you can improve it to help avoid future errors. If you want more tips on how to do this just ask. +QThere is a thank you for buying ​this e-book published by Hachette Digital blurb at the end of The Shack RevisitedShould ​set it at header 1 or should I do something else with it?
- +
-**would not stress over this**; if it is only happening ​with large books, and after evaluating your workflow you find that you are still having some images slip through that is okay. The best way to identify exactly where they are only occurs **after** the Production Coordinator converts the book at tests the new file.+
  
 +A: You can simply remove this entire section.
  
 ---- ----
  
-Q: I'm trying to keep in mind the aim for clarity and focus on relevant information,​ but I'm struggling with thisOne of the first maps in this book is map of the North-West area of Canada with a lot of lakes, rivers, and important villages labeledThroughout the book, there are a few other maps which "zoom in" ​on specific areas which have already been described in this larger map, perhaps with some added detailsDo I need to re-describe ​the area exactly? Or how should I proceed with these cases? For example, I've included the large map of The North-West ​and a map of Red River. Lots of the info in the Red River map are already present/​described in the North-West map.+Q: Another question about "​What ​the Bible is All About"This is about the glossary. It gives pronunciation guide for many of the terms (eg. "eunuch (YOO-nuhk)" ​which includes uppercase letters to show which syllable receives the emphasisIs it okay to leave all the uppercase letters alone and add Prod Note explaining that screen readers may not pronounce ​the pronunciation guide portions correctly?
  
-{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​front1.jpg?​400|}} +A: Yes, we can just leave as is writtensince that’s the way to indicate pronunciation. An optional producer’s note at the beginning ​of the section ​is a good idea! =)
-{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​f0039-01.jpg?​400|}} +
- +
-A: Maps are challenging for anyone. ​ If you haven'​t already checked it outyou should go look at the Alt-text samples ​we have on the [[public:​nnels:​etext:​alt_text_samples|wiki]] (there are two map examples that could help.) ​ To answer your questions: I would not repeat what has already been described. ​ You can start the zoomed in descriptions with something along the lines of 'This map is a closer image of the Red River area...'​ you could include some sweeping description like "it includes the areas between these rivers"​ or "it is bordered by these rivers"​ etc.  Then you can add more detail into.  Remember that starting big and going small can help in these cases. I also recommend opening a new document to work on the descriptions,​ so you can easily edit and rewrite ​as you go.  It is good to remember what the purpose of the map is, and to base your description on that purpose. ​ In this case it looks like the map is meant to show the layout ​of the land, so you should describe it in a way the listener can get a sense of the layout. Where are the rivers and important points? Where to do they lead to. You can start big (this is a map of this area that features rivers and this lakethen start at one point and work your way through the map like you are traveling through it. Reading it aloud will also help.+
  
 ---- ----
  
-Q: In Murach'​s Python Programming,​ there are many pages that are captioned and referred to elsewhere as "​Figures"​. (For example, page 25 in the PDF file is labeled as "​Figure 1-1" and page 27 is "​Figure 1-2". I looked ahead a few chapters and it actually looks like almost every other page is a "​Figure"​). These Figures contain a mixture of tables, images and text. I'm wondering what the best way is to handle these. Would it make sense to treat them as textboxes so they are marked off from the regular text and move the figure caption to the top of the page and make it a heading within the textbox? My concern is that if I treat them as an image with a caption - which seems to be the current format - the user won't be able to navigate to them when they'​re referenced in the main text. What's your advice?  ​ 
  
-AYou do not have to treat them as a textbox, you can just move the header up to the beginning and assign it the correct hierarchy (i.e. make it lower that the headers above it.) When it comes to the images themselvesthey seem to have been converted in different ways, and should be treated case-by-case. For example, in Figure 1-1 converted all as text. The four general purposes should be list (you can treat the header ​of this list as normal textMy reasoning here is that not all the headings ​in these figures work as headings for accessibility--for instance the table would become a caption. ​ Since this is the case we should try and be consistent and avoid confusion by treating these particular headings as either captions or normal text depending ​on the context. This can help make the document more uniform ​in conversionDoes that make sense?) For the next part, which is the table, the header would be the caption of the table, and then for the next section the header can be treated ​as normal text.  In Figure 1-2, you can cut the image up into three images with the headers as captions. Remember, if you do have an image that is text (in these cases HTML examples) you can transcribe them into inline producers notes. ​ This is a complicated book, so if you have any other questions do not hesitate to ask. +QIn the book "​What ​the Bible is All About"there is sort of mnemonic that I'm unsure how to formatIt'​s ​in chapter 45 on page 508 when I view it in Adobe Digital EditionsIt displays ​as follows:
  
 +Forsaking
  
-----+All
  
 +I
  
-Q: What do I do if there aren't any page numbers in a kid's book? The wiki says to make sure my page numbers that I'm using for page headings match up with the book. I'm working on Birdsong and I'm using Calibre to view it and don't see any page numbers.+Take
  
-A: I opened this up in my Kindle reader to check if this was an issue with Calibre (.azw3 is a kindle file) and it still did not show numbers. ​ In this case just assign the headings in order of the pages they appear (i.e. the first page of the story is Page One and so on.)+Him
  
-----+So, it looks like a list but isn't really a list. And it has the first letter of each word bolded to show that they spell "​Faith"​. For now, I have left it with each word on a separate line but not as a list and I applied Strong style to the first letter of each word to mimic how it appears in the book. Do you think there'​s a better way to handle it?
  
 +A: The way you handled this is correct. You don't have to format this as a list, and keep the first letter in strong style. ​ Good work!
  
-Q: I'm working on the play "1 Hour Photo."​ It contains a few Japanese characters but in the conversion, the characters were changed to Roman alphabet letters instead. The English translation is given for the symbols so I'm wondering if I should just erase the Roman alphabet letters. Or would it be better to insert the proper ideogram back in? If so, how do I do that?  
  
-[Here is an example: Tetsuro raises both hands to illustrate the ideogram for "​mountain,"​ Ill.] +----
  
-Another option I thought of was to copy the image of the ideogram from the PDF file and paste it into the Word file. Then, add alt-text to it. What do you think? 
  
-AYou should insert ​the proper ideogram back in.  You can do this using unicode. Here are [[public:​nnels:​etext:​symbols#​using_unicode_for_symbols|the instructions on how to set that up]]--but remember, some [[public:​nnels:​etext:​language#​working_with_images_of_words_and_different_alphabets|languages are too complex for this technique]]. ​ If you feel confident you can insert the correct ideogram, the do so.  Remember, we **never** have text as images, even if it is in another alphabet+QUnsure if the tables were formatted correctly ​in Appendix A at the end of the book 101 ways to meeting angels by Karen Paolino.
  
-Q: That'​s ​the thing, I don't know how to find the correct Japanese ideogram in Unicode. I don't even know which Japanese alphabet to search in - apparently there are several. I don't feel at all confident that I can identify the correct symbol. I know how to insert symbols with Unicode - the missing part is how to identify the specific code for the correct Japanese symbol. I think it would be one of the CJK Unified Ideographs but I don't know which one and I can't just search "​mountain"​ to find the correct one. The instructions you point to on the wiki don't explain that part. To me, this falls under "Some languages cannot ​be transcribed due to the complexity of that language" ​which is why I was wondering if I should find a work-around to still include the symbols for people who do understand Japanese. Or, just leaving the symbols out since the English translation as well as the English pronunciation of the Japanese word are both included.+From the Tables section ​of the wiki"A caption or description should always ​be included ​to give context to a table"
  
-A: In this case, since it is an issue of conversion and you are not confident ​in finding to correct ideogram, then simply put a producer's not at the beginning of the book explaining that the original Japanese ideograms did not convert ​to this version ​of the text, but the translation ​and punctuation ​are present--or something better written than that to explain ​the issue.+I am interpreting the '​or' ​in 'caption or description'​ to mean to include one of the two (either caption or description). But given our past conversation on inclusion of alt text, perhaps i should be including both? Caption and Description?​ But when I followed ​the wiki's instructions to add a description,​ it was greyed out and I was unable to edit it, so only captions ​are present ​for the tables.
  
-----+A: I will fix the wording in the wiki, but every table should have Alt-Text. 
 +When it comes to not being able to access the Alt-Text in the table priorities, it looks like this is an issue with they way the document was saved. ​ Just resave and replace the document using the 'Save As' option and double check to ensure it is saving as a .docx file. It will prompt you to replace the file, just accept and replace the file. It should now work!
  
 +I creates a short video to illustrate what I mean: https://​screencast-o-matic.com/​watch/​cYn6q2wTtP
  
-Q: Another poetry question: In the book Treaty #, on page 1, 33, and 63, there are a bunch of backwards words. They'​re English but they'​re spelled backwards. They also seem to be slightly out of order. I'm just wondering if you have any suggestions about how to handle this? Do you think I should just leave it as is?  The backwards English words are so hard to read (which I think is the author'​s point) but people with print disabilities may not be able to access them at all this way. I'm wondering about inserting a second version with the words spelled normally but still out of order, with a producer'​s note explaining that in the original version, they are spelled backwards? Just for accessibility reasons. +Word is a finicky beast!
- +
-A: In this case, leave it as is since it is the intent of the author to have it difficult or impossible to read.  Insert ​inline producer'​s not before the title of the poem explaining that the poem includes words that are backwards and out of order to intentionally create confusion for the reader.+
  
  
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 +Q: I'm just about finished this book but am having difficulty with one section: the Photo Credits at the end. They provide credit for some of the photos but I'm having a hard time telling which credit goes with which photos. They appear to be referring to roman numeral page numbers within the photo inserts but when I view the epub file in Calibre or in Adobe Digital Editions, I don't see the page numbers in the photo section so I have no idea which photos are on which page. So I can't tell which credit goes with which photo. I'm also not sure how to format this section. It seems a bit like an index where it's pointing the reader to specific pages so I was going to treat it like an index and format it as a list with a Prod Note about the page numbers being included but not valid. And then I was going to copy each photo credit and add it to the caption for the photo it belongs to (but then ran into the problem of not knowing which credit belongs to which photo).
  
-QIn the book of poetry I'm working on (StBoniface Elegies), there are quite a few words marked with italics. On the page on poetry in the wiki, it says, "​Sometimes certain styles can be retained within the poem, such as italics. If you are working with a poem with such formatting please contact us to advise how edit." So, could you let me know how I should handle the italics in this book? +AFirst off--wow this is terribly formattedNow to your questions:
  
-A: You can retain ​the italics ​in the lines of poetry, but remove ​the italics from the titles, blockquotes,​ Acknowledgements, and About the Author. The italics ​in the poems themselves are there for emphasiswhile all the other times it is just a visual stylistic choice that does not add meaning ​to the text and therefore not needed for conversion.+I opened ​the book up in Calibre, and looked at the photo credit section. The text at the top of the section states that all photos are copyright Stevie Cameron expect where otherwise noted. Then the hyperlinked list goes directly to the images that are NOT credited to Stevie Cameron, and the clue to which image that is in in the hyperlink text.  For instance, the first on is the top image on the page ( ii (top) Toronto Star/​GetStock.) I am still not sure what the roman numerals are, but they are confusing. Following that logic you can identify each image as it hyperlinks to the respective pages. ​ Since we don't use page numbers the best way to deal with this section ​is just take each copyright statement and add it into the end of the captions for each image (or as caption itself if the image has no caption.) Then erase the hyperlinked list, but retain the section with the opening sentences and add an inline producers note explaining what you changed (i.e. in the original book the additional copyright information was presented as a hyperlinked list. Due to the conversion ​process we have reformatted that information to be included in the captions of the images respectively...or something along those lines.) ​ Let me know if you have more questions. ​ I am also gonna copy this to the Q&A section of the wiki.  
 + 
 +As for locating page numbers in Calibre, there is a text bar in the top left corner of the E-Book viewer that shows the page numbers (e.g. 486.0/1435 is page 486 out of 1435)
  
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 +Q: In Murach'​s Python Programming,​ there are many pages that are captioned and referred to elsewhere as "​Figures"​. (For example, page 25 in the PDF file is labeled as "​Figure 1-1" and page 27 is "​Figure 1-2". I looked ahead a few chapters and it actually looks like almost every other page is a "​Figure"​). These Figures contain a mixture of tables, images and text. I'm wondering what the best way is to handle these. Would it make sense to treat them as textboxes so they are marked off from the regular text and move the figure caption to the top of the page and make it a heading within the textbox? My concern is that if I treat them as an image with a caption - which seems to be the current format - the user won't be able to navigate to them when they'​re referenced in the main text. What's your advice?  ​
  
-QAlso relating ​to the book of poems (StBoniface Elegies), I've come across a poem that is divided into sections ​and each section has a titleSo essentially they are sub-titles and normally I would give them the next level of headings. But since this is poetry, I'​m ​not sure how to handle them. Should I tag the sub-titles with the Poem Title styleWith the next level heading style? Or not tag them at all? The poem I'm referring to is called "​downtown campus"​ in Part 1 of the book.  +AYou do not have to treat them as a textbox, you can just move the header up to the beginning and assign it the correct hierarchy ​(i.e. make it lower that the headers above it.) When it comes to the images themselves, they seem to have been converted in different ways, and should be treated case-by-caseFor example, in Figure 1-1 converted all as text. The four general purposes should be a list (you can treat the header ​of this list as normal text. My reasoning here is that not all the headings in these figures work as headings for accessibility--for instance the table would become a caption. ​ Since this is the case we should try and be consistent and avoid confusion by treating these particular headings as either captions or normal text depending on the context. This can help make the document more uniform in conversion. Does that make sense?) For the next part, which is the table, the header would be the caption ​of the tableand then for the next section the header can be treated as normal text In Figure 1-2, you can cut the image up into three images with the headers as captions. Remember, if you do have an image that is text (in these cases HTML examples) you can transcribe them into inline producers ​notes.  ​This is complicated bookso if you have any other questions ​do not hesitate to ask
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-A: Keep them as Poem (DAISY)but retain ​the italicsYou can also put an inline producers ​note to explain what you have done. The wiki has some examples of this in the poetry section.  ​Poems are often bit trickysince they are both creative and we are limited by what we can do within the DAISY consortium standards for access Hope that helps! ​+
  
  
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 A: Try saving the document as .docx and it should work. If you have done this and still have problems please let me know. A: Try saving the document as .docx and it should work. If you have done this and still have problems please let me know.
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-Q: One more question from His Needs, Her Needs. At the very end of the book, there are 5 full-page images that are advertisements for other books by the author, for his website, and for his publisher. They aren't decorative but I'm not sure how important it is to keep them (and therefore add alt-text to describe their content). Would you recommend deleting them or keeping them? 
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-A: You can delete these images. 
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-Q: In Appendix B of His Needs, Her Needs, there is a 10 page questionnaire but each page is an image file that contains text, not actually text. Am I right that I should transcribe the text from each image and then delete the image files? 
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-A: In this instance the context is critical to understanding the book, and should be transcribed,​ the images should be removed, and a Producer'​s Note should be places at the beginning of the book explaining this has been done. I took a peek at some other parts of the book, and there seems to be other surveys as well.  When it comes to these sorts of images it depends again on context, and is a judgement call. If the details of the survey is critical to the understanding of the book, then we do the transcription and Prod Not as mentioned above; if the survey is not critical to the understanding the book then simple Alt-Text is enough (remember to keep the Alt-text brief and concise, and you can refer to our[[public:​nnels:​etext:​alt_text_samples| Alt text examples]] for some inspiration if you need it.)  There is a Question and Answer a bit further down on this page that addresses this as well for your reference. You can also see the section on [[public:​nnels:​etext:​images#​images_of_surveys|Image and Surveys]] for more information. 
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-Q: Another caption question! The book I'm working on has a painting at the beginning of each story that goes with the theme of the story. I have extracted the images of the paintings from the epub file but they each have the painting'​s title and year of creation incorporated into the image as a caption. I know that a caption in the image isn't good enough because it won't be read by TTS software and will be hard to see for people with limited vision. But is it okay that there will be a second caption when I add mine or do I need to figure out how to crop the image to get rid of the built-in caption? 
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-A: Great question! ​ There are two options for this; (1) you could simply transcribe the text from the image at the end of the caption that already exits, or (2) you could transcribe the text from the image into the Alt-text. 
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-Q: What do I do when a single caption refers to and describes two different images? Is it okay to give both images the same caption? ie. copy and paste the caption and apply it once to the first image and then again to the second image? 
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-A: You only have to apply the caption to one of the photos. ​ With the Alt-text and the placing of the images the reader will be able to figure out what is going on. 
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 A: Great question. You should replace it with a proper emoticon symbol, since we don't want to change the original too much and people who have partial sight do read our books. TTS can read emoticons, and you should treat them like other symbols and enter them in using Unicode. The directions on how to set up Unicode are on the [[public:​nnels:​etext:​symbols|Symbols & Abbreviations/​Acronyms]] page (I put in a new heading 'Using Unicode for Symbols'​.) You can use the search feature on the page that lists all the Unicode. For example, I searched winky face and it gave me the Unicode [[https://​unicode-table.com/​en/​1F609/​|here]]. A: Great question. You should replace it with a proper emoticon symbol, since we don't want to change the original too much and people who have partial sight do read our books. TTS can read emoticons, and you should treat them like other symbols and enter them in using Unicode. The directions on how to set up Unicode are on the [[public:​nnels:​etext:​symbols|Symbols & Abbreviations/​Acronyms]] page (I put in a new heading 'Using Unicode for Symbols'​.) You can use the search feature on the page that lists all the Unicode. For example, I searched winky face and it gave me the Unicode [[https://​unicode-table.com/​en/​1F609/​|here]].
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-Q: I have a question about italics in quotes. In the book I'm working on, the author has compiled an extensive list of quotes from other sources but then gone in and added italics to many sections of the quotes. Sometimes just a few words at a time but other times, entire sentences and even paragraphs are italicized. Almost always, the endnote for the quote then includes the phrase "​emphasis added"​. From a print disability point of view, many of those italics are unnecessary and present a barrier to readability. But I hesitate to change the author'​s intention of highlighting parts of the quote, especially since they'​ve typed "​emphasis added" in the endnote. Are the rules about when to apply emphasis style and when not to different in this situation? If I do remove the italics, do I also delete the "​emphasis added" from the endnote? 
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-A: Good Question. ​ In cases like these emphasis can be tricky. If the author wrote "​emphasis added" we can keep it, unless it is a large block of text such as an entire paragraph. Do not delete anything written in the book, I realize it is not perfect but we are not editors, just reformatting for accessibility. 
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 A: You leave any spelling errors as is.  Our jobs are to reformat the books to be DAISY compatible, so we avoid edits of the content as much as possible. Let me know if you need more clarification on this. A: You leave any spelling errors as is.  Our jobs are to reformat the books to be DAISY compatible, so we avoid edits of the content as much as possible. Let me know if you need more clarification on this.
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-Q: My current book makes extensive use of endnotes, which can sometimes appear in the original like this.[4][5] When going through to edit this, should I insert a superscripted comma or something between the 4 and 5 to better differentiate between the two notes? ​ 
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-A: Great question! You don't have to add any additional punctuation. Simply insert the endnotes beside each other. TTS will be able to read them as separate notes, and the links will be separate as well, so there should be no confusion between them.  
  
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 A: You can leave it as is. Most TTS software is able to read it properly. A: You can leave it as is. Most TTS software is able to read it properly.
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-Q: I am editing an illustrated children'​s book that has a sentence where I think I need to indicate a foreign language. It is just a single word but it is clear that a change in language is intended (Page 3 of The Gathering by Theresa Meuse). I tried to follow the instructions for creating a new style but the Mi'​kmaw language is not one of the language options. What should I do? 
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-A: Unfortunately,​ there are currently no language tags for that language. ​ What you can do is put a Producer'​s Note in the book with something like "This book includes words and phrases in Mi'​kmaw language. Text-to-speech software will not be able to pronounce these words and phrases correctly in the Word version."​ 
  
  
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 As for the hashtag symbol itself, nothing special needs to be done—you can simply use the # (number sign) key on your keyboard. Any symbols that exist on your keyboard or in MS Word itself can be inserted as usual. As for the hashtag symbol itself, nothing special needs to be done—you can simply use the # (number sign) key on your keyboard. Any symbols that exist on your keyboard or in MS Word itself can be inserted as usual.
  
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-Q: I have a book that uses Innuinaktun words, but it also has two images. One is an image of a table with the word symbols beside the sound (no english translation),​ and the other is a full pieces of text in Innuinaktun. ​ How should I address these images in the Alt-Text? And should I also include a producers note about the Innuinaktun words?** 
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-{{ :​public:​nnels:​etext:​innut_table.png?​400 |}} 
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-{{ :​public:​nnels:​etext:​innut_image_01.png?​400 |}} 
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-A: Looks like this is the Inuktitut language, according to the publication information. Inuktitut can be represented by [[https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Unified_Canadian_Aboriginal_Syllabics_(Unicode_block)|Unicode Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics]]. 
-We will need to translate the images into Unicode. 
-If you're using Mac, enable your "​Unicode Hex Input" keyboard (see Language section in wiki for instructions). To type each symbol/​letter into Word, hold down the ''​alt''​ key and type the 4-digit number, i.e. ''​1400''​. ​ 
  
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 ''​^m''​ stands for manual page break. ''​^m''​ stands for manual page break.
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-Q: I have an image of a survey. How should I re format this? 
-{{ :​public:​nnels:​etext:​survey_format.png?​400 |}} 
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-A: It depends on the context of the image. If it’s critical to understanding the book that readers know exactly what was asked in the survey then we might want to translate the entire survey content in a prodnote; otherwise, if it doesn’t really matter to the reading experience what the details of the survey are then alt-text will do. It’s a bit of a judgement call. 
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-Q: I am editing a book that has very long tables that are images. ​ I obviously need to convert them to readable tables in Word, but my question is should I create on very large table, or should I cut it down into smaller tables? 
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-{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_one.png?​400|}} 
-{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_two.png?​400|}} 
-{{ :​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_three.png?​400 |}} 
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-A: In this case you can break the sub-sections down into their own tables with each disorder its own table. ​ You can caption each table with the name of the disorder. 
  
  
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 A: This can be formatted as normal paragraph text. A: This can be formatted as normal paragraph text.
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-Q: I am editing a play.  All the dialogue begins with the characters name, e.g. Character: Dialogue. This part is clear, but I am wondering if there is anything special you want me to do with the stage directions. ​ Maybe an inline producers note indicating it is a stage direction and not dialogue? 
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-A: Good question. The stage directions are normally marked as "​asides"​ or "​sidebars"​. We can follow the guidelines for [[public:​nnels:​etext:​textboxes_and_sidebars|sidebar]] content. 
  
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public/nnels/etext/q_a.1585162246.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/03/25 11:50 by rachel.osolen