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public:nnels:etext:tables [2020/03/25 11:41]
rachel.osolen [Table Headers]
public:nnels:etext:tables [2020/05/08 14:03] (current)
rachel.osolen [Q&A]
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 When tables are not structured accessibly, the data they contain can quickly become a meaningless sea of numbers, facts and figures to someone moving through them a cell at a time. Readers who cannot see the table cannot use visual cheats like checking the alignment and scanning back to the top headings to orient themselves as they go. Equivalent information needs to be encoded into the table to facilitate comprehension. When tables are not structured accessibly, the data they contain can quickly become a meaningless sea of numbers, facts and figures to someone moving through them a cell at a time. Readers who cannot see the table cannot use visual cheats like checking the alignment and scanning back to the top headings to orient themselves as they go. Equivalent information needs to be encoded into the table to facilitate comprehension.
  
-Tables are meant to be used for tabular information (data). Tables should never be used to lay out documents. When editing a book, recreate charts and tables using the default functionality of the softwarei.e. the Insert Table tool.+Tables are meant to be used for tabular information (data). Tables should never be used to lay out documents. When editing a book, recreate charts and tables using the default functionality of the software ​(i.e. the ''​Insert Table'' ​tool).
  
 Tables have a logical reading order from left to right and top to bottom. Screenreader users can easily navigate to and examine data in tables. There are specific keyboard controls for reading tables that differ to the controls for reading regular text. When non-tabular text is rendered with tables, the reading controls are incorrect. This can make it confusing and difficult to read the document with a screenreader. Tables have a logical reading order from left to right and top to bottom. Screenreader users can easily navigate to and examine data in tables. There are specific keyboard controls for reading tables that differ to the controls for reading regular text. When non-tabular text is rendered with tables, the reading controls are incorrect. This can make it confusing and difficult to read the document with a screenreader.
  
-Do not present non-tabular information in a table format even if it presented as such in a booki.e. a grocery list with two columns. ​ Present such information as a list in two columns (see [[public:​nnels:​etext:​columns|Formatting Columns]]). ​Please ​note, that columns ​are rarely used when reformatting a book, since they are often just for aesthetics. ​ If this is the case the information is probably best formatted as a ''​list''​ or ''​normal''​ depending on the context. If you are unsure please contact the Project ​Coordinator.+Do not present non-tabular information in a table format even if it presented as such in a book (i.e. a grocery list with two columns).  Present such information as a list in two columns (see [[public:​nnels:​etext:​columns|Formatting Columns]]). ​ 
 + 
 +<note>​Columns ​are rarely used when reformatting a book, since they are often just for aesthetics. ​ If this is the case the information is probably best formatted as a ''​list''​ or ''​normal''​ depending on the context. If you are unsure please contact the Production ​Coordinator.</​note>​
  
 ====How to insert a table==== ====How to insert a table====
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 ===== Q&A ===== ===== Q&A =====
 +
 +Q: I am editing a book that has very long tables that are images. ​ I obviously need to convert them to readable tables in Word, but my question is should I create on very large table, or should I cut it down into smaller tables?
 +
 +{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_one.png?​400|}}
 +{{:​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_two.png?​400|}}
 +{{ :​public:​nnels:​etext:​long_table_example_three.png?​400 |}}
 +
 +
 +A: In this case you can break the sub-sections down into their own tables with each disorder its own table. ​ You can caption each table with the name of the disorder.
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 **Q: In Theomatics, instead of creating tables the author has used images. ​ Should I put a producers note in for each '​table'?​** **Q: In Theomatics, instead of creating tables the author has used images. ​ Should I put a producers note in for each '​table'?​**
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 A: Images of tables need to be presented as tables, just as images of text should be presented as text. You can see how to make accessible tables here:​[[public:​nnels:​etext:​tables|Tables]]. If you have questions about creating tables, let us know! We may need to add in a short alt description if the table is not sufficiently described in the surrounding text. A: Images of tables need to be presented as tables, just as images of text should be presented as text. You can see how to make accessible tables here:​[[public:​nnels:​etext:​tables|Tables]]. If you have questions about creating tables, let us know! We may need to add in a short alt description if the table is not sufficiently described in the surrounding text.
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public/nnels/etext/tables.1585161686.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/03/25 11:41 by rachel.osolen