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NNELS Styles Overview

For instructions on installing and using the NNELS Template in Microsoft Word, see: Using the NNELS Template

The NNELS Styles table outlines what the Styles in the NNELS Template (NNELS_Styles.dotx) are used for and how they translate to DAISY XML. The table also outlines how the use of certain Word tools will translate to DAISY XML, such as the insert caption, insert endnote, and insert table tools. Further information about using the Word tools can be found on their respective wiki pages.

Using the Styles in the NNELS Template will make e-text editing more efficient and ensure that we have consistent formatting across documents, and that the Word documents smoothly convert to DAISY. The resulting DAISY book will be well-structured and understandable by accessibility software, and conform to DAISY 3 Specifications for the Digital Talking Book.

There are still limitations to converting Word to DAISY XML, so cleaning-up of the XML file is still needed (not for you to worry about).

NNELS Styles

Word Style NameDAISY XML CodeDescription of Use
Titles & Headings
Heading 1<h1>Heading 1</h1>Level 1 heading. Contains the text of the heading.
Heading 2<h2>Heading 2</h2>Level 2 heading (sub-section of H1). Contains the text of the heading.
Heading 3<h3>Heading 3</h3>Level 3 heading (sub-section of H2). Contains the text of the heading.
Heading 4<h4>Heading 4</h4>Level 4 heading (sub-section of H3). Contains the text of the heading.
Heading 5<h5>Heading 5</h5>Level 5 heading (sub-section of H4). Contains the text of the heading.
Heading 6<h6>Heading 6</h6>Level 6 heading (sub-section of H5). Contains the text of the heading.
Quotations
Blockquote (DAISY)<blockquote>
<p><em>"The hidden harmony is better than the obvious."</em></p>
<author>Pablo Picasso</author>
</blockquote>
<blockquote> indicates a block of quoted content that is set off from the surrounding text by paragraph breaks. Block quotations are used for long quotations.

This is a paragraph-level style and cannot be applied to text inline.
Citation (DAISY)<cite>1. Dante. Paradiso, translated by Philip H. Wickstead (New York: Modern Library/Random House 1932), Canto 9:103-105, p.458.</cite><cite> marks a reference (or citation) to another document.

It is commonly used in Bibliographies.
Bold and Italics
Strong<p>When pressing the blue button,<em>hold down for two full seconds.</em>And remember,<strong>DO NOT PRESS THE RED BUTTON!</strong></p>The <em> and <strong> tags are relative indicators of emphasis. The <em> tag indicates moderate emphasis and the <strong> tag heavier emphasis. Their application will depend upon the types of emphasis employed in a document. In a book in which italics and boldface are used for emphasis, <em> would mark the former, and <strong> the latter.
EmphasisSee above.See above.
Tables
*Note: This is not a Word Style. To insert a table, go to File > Insert Table.Insert Table

Properly inserting a table in Word will ensure table elements are marked up correctly in XML. The table <table>, table headers <th>, table body <tbody>, table rows <tr>, and table data <td> will be marked up accordingly. Table captions will also be marked up properly.
Foreign Languages
*Note: This is not a Word Style. To identify an entire paragraph or block of text as another language, select the text and go to Tools > Language and apply the relevant language.Insert Language

Use to identify text in foreign languages. Create a new character or paragraph-level style named after the language.
Lists
*Note: This is not a Word Style. To identify a list of items, use the List toolbar icons in Word (bulleted, numbered).Insert List

Example of an Ordered list:

<list type="ol">
<li>peel fruit.</li>
<li>cut fruit in bite sized pieces.</li>
<li>sprinkle fruit with sugar and lime juice to taste.</li>
<li>stir salad.</li>
<li>chill for one hour.</li>
</list>

Example of an Unordered list:

<h2>Books</h2>
<list type="pl">
<li><cite>Dinesen, Isak. Syv fantastiske Forteollinger. Copenhagen: Reitzels, 1937.</cite></li>
<li><cite>Dinesen, Isak. Out of Africa. London: Putnam, 1937.</cite>
</li>
</list>
A list is a sequence of two or more items. The four common types of lists are: 1) ordered lists (list items are numbered or lettered); 2) unordered lists (list items are unnumbered and usually marked with a bullet or other typographical device); 3) preformatted lists (no numbering nor bullets are added for display purposes); and 4) definition lists (see below).

Lists are commonly used to mark up bibliographies or tables of contents.
Definition Data (DAISY)

Example of a Definition list:

<dl>
<dt>mango</dt>
<dd>tropical fruit with sweet golden flesh</dd>
<dt>lychee</dt>
<dd>tropical fruit with deep red leathery skin and clear white flesh</dd>
<dt>carambola</dt>
<dd>star shaped tropical fruit with tart lemon-pineapple flavour</dd>
<dt>rambutan</dt>
<dd>egg-shaped tropical fruit similar to lychees with leathery skin covered in soft red hairs</dd>
</dl>
Definition lists have list items that generally consist of term/value pairs, such as a term followed by its definition. A common example would be a Glossary.

When creating a definition list, follow these steps:
1) Select the entire list (all the definition terms and values) and apply the Definition Data (DAISY) style. In DTBook XML, the Definition Data (DAISY) style wraps the definitions with <dd> and the definition list with <dl> elements.
2) Then, select each term and apply the Definition Term (DAISY) style. In DTBook XML, the definition term is given by the <dt> element, such as mango and lychee in the example.

Definition Term (DAISY)

See above.The Definition Term (DAISY) style wraps the definition term in <dt> tags.

See above.
Poetry
Poem (DAISY)

<poem>
<title>The cloud</title>
<author>Amir Khusrau</author> <line>The weeping cloud becomes parted from his friend.</line> <line>Can I part my heart from my heart's companion on a day such as this?</line> <line>The weeping cloud, my companion and I stood leave-taking.</line> <line>I weep apart, the cloud apart, my companion apart.</line> <byline>Translation: Anon</byline></poem>
The <poem> tags wrap a poem or fragment of a poem specifically. It can be applied to any text where definition of poetic structure is required, i.e. texts displaying elements of versification, metre and rhyme where the use of <p> is considered insufficiently accurate.

This Style must be the first style that you apply to a poem. Select the entire poem, including the title, author and byline, and apply the Poem (DAISY) Style. This style wraps the text in <poem> and <line> tags.
Poem - Title (DAISY)<title>The cloud</title>Identifies the title of the poem.

This is a paragraph-level style and cannot be applied inline (the author's name must be in its own paragraph).

Apply this style after you have applied the Poem (DAISY) style.
Author (DAISY)<author>Amir Khusrau</author>Identifies the author of the poem.

This is a paragraph-level style and cannot be applied inline (the author's name must be in its own paragraph).

Apply this style after you have applied the Poem (DAISY) style.
Poem - Byline (DAISY)<byline>Translation: Anon</byline>The <byline> element is useful in some cases; it is a generic element indicating information about a creator or contributor to the work.

This is a paragraph-level style and cannot be applied inline (it must be within its own paragraph).
Images
*Note: This not a Word Style. Insert image captions using the Insert Caption function.Insert Caption

<imggroup>
<img alt="A black and white photograph of approximately twenty men, including Felix Opatowski's father, Nathan Opatowski, holding large mallets and shovels. They are wearing collared jackets and hats, and they are smiling for the camera." id="rId114" src="Gatehouse_to_hell_20170804115900.jpg"/>
<caption imgref="rId114">1 Felix OpatowskiŠ—Ès father, Nathan Opatowski, seated in the front row, far left, in the forced labour camp in PoznaÜ stadium, circa 1940.</caption>
</imggroup>
A caption for an image must be inserted using the Insert Caption tool in Word.


*Note: This not a Word Style. Insert alternative text using the Alt Text function.Insert Alt Text

<imggroup>
<img alt="A black and white photograph of approximately twenty men, including Felix Opatowski's father, Nathan Opatowski, holding large mallets and shovels. They are wearing collared jackets and hats, and they are smiling for the camera." id="rId114" src="Gatehouse_to_hell_20170804115900.jpg"/>
<caption imgref="rId114">1 Felix OpatowskiŠ—Ès father, Nathan Opatowski, seated in the front row, far left, in the forced labour camp in PoznaÜ stadium, circa 1940.</caption>
</imggroup>
An image (<img>) will always contain an alt attribute. It should contain a short description of the image.

For extended image descriptions, use the Prodnote - Optional (DAISY) style.
Producer's Notes
Prodnote - Optional (DAISY)




Example of a Producer's Note to describe differences between the print and DAISY book

<prodnote render="optional">
<p>This book includes an index with page numbers, which were kept for informational purposes only. Original page numbers have not been retained in this digital book. Please use the search function on your reading device to find terms of interest. If you need a version of this book with original page numbering and references, please contact NNELS Support directly.</p>
</prodnote>

Example of a Producer's Note for an extended image description

<imggroup> <img id="img1_1" src="fig1_01.png" alt="By the way, Sam, as someday you'll be paying for my entitlements, I'd like to thank you in advance." /> <caption imgref="img1_1">By the way, Sam, as someday you'll be paying for my entitlements, I'd like to thank you in advance.</caption> <prodnote render="optional" imgref="img1_1" id="pnote_p3" showin="blp">Reader's note: A cartoon shows a father in his easy chair looking at the newspaper. As his small son plays with a pull toy on the floor next to him, the father says to the boy, "By the way, Sam, as someday you'll be paying for my entitlements, I'd like to thank you in advance." End of note. </prodnote></imggroup>
Producer's notes are marked with the <prodnote> tag. A <prodnote> is language added to the DAISY book by the producing organization. Traditionally, it has been called a transcriber's note, reader's note, or editor's note.

It is commonly used to:

1) provide verbal descriptions of visual elements such as images, charts, graphs, etc., or

2) describe differences between the print book and the DAISY book.

Producer's notes must be identified as "required" or "optional" using the "render" attribute. Optional producer's notes may be turned on or off by the end user; that is, the playback device or browser includes settings that either automatically play all producer's notes as they are encountered or play only those marked as "required." The producer must decide for each <prodnote> whether it contains critical information and is thus marked as "required" or merely contains helpful information that an end user could skip without harm. If there's uncertainty whether to use the "optional" or "required" attribute, use "required".
Prodnote - Required (DAISY)See above.See above.
Notes (Footnote, Endnote)
* Note: This is not a Word Style. To insert notes, use the Insert Endnote tool.Insert Endnote

<p>Of the salvation she engendered she will be recipient, in heaven, where we "repent not, but smile; not at the sin, which cometh not again to mind, but at the Worth that ordered and provided."<noteref idref="#p21-fn1"class="footnote">1</noteref></p>

<note id="p21-fn1" class="footnote">1. Dante. Paradiso, translated by Philip H. Wickstead (New York: Modern Library/Random House 1932), Canto 9:103-105, p.458.</note>
All notes in a book, whether footnotes or section endnotes, automatically get converted to endnotes at the end of the DAISY book. To avoid conversion issues, we should insert notes as continuously numbered endnotes placed at the end of the Word document.

Document Metadata

Document properties in Microsoft Word are converted to metadata in the DAISY XML file. It is important to always insert the below properties in your file.

Document PropertiesDAISY XML CodeDescription of Use
Insert Title of the Book

<meta content="All Hands Lost : The Sinking of the Nova Scotian Gypsum Freighter Novadoc" name="dc:Title"/> This is the Title field in the document properties. It is usually found in File > Properties > Summary

This field translates to the <dc:Title> tag in the document metadata.

It also translates to the <doctitle> tag.
Insert Author of the Book

<meta content=Blain Henshaw" name="dc:Creator"/>This is the Author field in the document properties. It is usually found in File > Properties > Summary

If there is more than one author, separate their names with comma.

This field translates to the <dc:Creator> tag in the document metadata.

It also translated to the <docauthor> tag.
Insert Publisher of the Book

<meta content=National Network for Equitable Library Service" name="dc:Publisher"/>This is the Company field in the document properties. It is usually found in File > Properties > Summary

This field translates to the <dc:publisher> tag in the document metadata.

The Publisher should always state: National Network for Equitable Library Service.
public/nnels/etext/template-styles.txt · Last modified: 2020/04/03 10:56 by rachel.osolen